Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Web Secret 480: Beautycounter

 iWebU has a new look! Hope you like it!

This is a public service announcement.

Are you a person?

Do you:

1. Use makeup?
2. Wash your face?
3. Wash your body?

If you answered "YES" to any of these questions, then you need to know a dirty little secret:

When it comes to the personal care industry, US companies are allowed to use harmful ingredients and make their own judgments about safety.

Whaat?

In the European Union 1,400 chemicals are banned or restricted in personal care products. The United States has only partially banned 30 to date.

I wonder who benefits from this lack of regulation...

But I digress.

Lucky for us, Gregg Renfrew was horrified by this discovery and started Beautycounter, a line of bath, hair, beauty and skin care products that promises to never use products that are toxic.

Cue the video:


You can buy the products online, or with the help of my wonderful consultant Karen Duncan.

She can be contacted at karen@kldnyc.com.

If you are fortunate enough to live in the New York tri-state area, she will even make a house call.

Stay safe.

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Web Secret 479.5: Please update your account to enable third party hosting

Dear iWebU fans:

With zero notice, Photobucket announced via a spam like image and text (that appears at the bottom of my blog posts) that it wants thousands of bloggers to pay them $399 a year to host their photos.

Because I have been writing this blog since 2008 and have written close to 500 posts, it is physically impossible for me to fix every image on every post.

I am still working on a fix, but in the mean time, sincere apologies for the problem.

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Web Secret 479: PsyberGuide

There are hundreds of mental health apps and wearables out there, promising help for everything from anxiety to depression to more.

How do you know if they work?

You turn to an amazing resource, PsyberGuide.com.

Here is their manifesto:

"PsyberGuide is a non-profit website dedicated to consumers seeking to make responsible and informed decisions about computer and device-assisted therapies for mental illnesses.

PsyberGuide is also intended for professionals and researchers seeking to enhance their knowledge in this area.

PsyberGuide's goal is to provide accurate and reliable information about software designed to treat schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and anxiety disorders. PsyberGuide is committed to ensuring that this information is available to all, and that it is free of preference, bias, or endorsement."

PsyberGuide is a project of The One Mind Institute, a leading non-profit organization devoted to funding cures for brain illnesses." And a remarkable organization in and of itself.

If you go to their "Product Listing," you will note that each app is listed along with a PsyberGuide rating that corresponds to the amount of research and support backing the product. In addition, there is an App Quality Score on a scale of 1 to 5. Finally, there is a link to an expert review - if one exists.

How is that for thorough evidenced based vetting?

The founder of PsyberGuide, Stephen Schueller, PhD, is a member of the Internet World Health Research Center, a remarkable institution whose mission is to harness the power of technology to reach those most in need with effective interventions that can be administered via the Internet or via a mobile device.

Their goals are:
  • To contribute to the reduction of global health disparities
  • To develop evidence-based self-help Internet and mobile-based interventions and to make them available to anyone around the world at no cost
  • To conduct innovative eHealth and mHealth research.
I'm already feeling better.

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Web Secret 478: The Typewriter Insurgency

F. Scott Fitzgerald famously said: "The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function."

So right this minute, and just for the hell of it, half of me wants to throw my laptop out the window and join the "Typewriter Insurgency."

You see, back in 2012, Richard Polt decided he was fed up with our digital world, and he wrote a brief manifesto in his blog:

"We assert our right to resist the Paradigm, to rebel against the Information Regime, to escape the Data Stream.

We strike a blow for self-reliance, privacy and coherence against dependency, surveillance, and disintegration.

We affirm the written word and written thought against
multimedia, multitasking, and the meme.

We choose the real over representation,
the physical over the digital,
the durable over the unsustainable,
the self-sufficient over the efficient."


Polt believes in the typewriter.

His manifesto has led to a book, "The Typewriter Revolution," (a typist's companion for the 21st century.) And to being featured in a documentary "California Typewriter," "a portrait of artists, writers, and collectors who remain steadfastly loyal to the typewriter as a tool and muse."

It almost makes me want to buy one.

And then I remember:

1. Typing is not compatible with manicures

2. Typewriters are heavy

3. They break and require schlepping to the repair store - see number 2

4. Remember carbon paper, white out, and erasable onion skin paper?

5. They use ribbons.

I am not ready to move to that cabin in the woods.

Off the grid.